Michael Chang: “the U.S. Department of Justice Had Already Proven My Innocence”

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Some media have reported on Dr. Michael Chang, the Chairman of OBI Pharma, Inc. (4174.TWO, hereinafter referred to as OBI) and the former president of the Academia Sinica, Dr. Chi-Huey Wong regarding 1.5 million shares of technology stocks of OBI and a donation of $300,000 from OBI to Scripps Laboratories.

Today, Dr. Chang solemnly declares again that both are long-closed cases. All relevant details have already been disclosed fully with substantial and powerful evidence to the prosecutors during their investigation into the recent case of OBI. The U.S. Department of Justice had also closed both cases after a two-year investigation and proven Dr. Wong and Dr. Chang innocent.
Today, Dr. Chang is making the following statement on the technology stocks of OBI and the donation to Scripps Laboratories
I. On 30 September and 16 December in 2011, the board of directors of OBI approved the resolution to issue 1.5 million shares of technology stocks to Dr. Chang in return for his acquisition of “the technique for leading the research and development of new medicines.” When OBI was applying for a registration of change to the Ministry of Economic Affairs, R.O.C. (hereinafter referred to as MOEA) in order to issue new stocks, the ministry had a different understanding of whether technology stocks involve labor service. MOEA suggested OBI issue the stocks for other purposes. Putting the development of the company as the first priority, Dr. Chang believed that such an application would consume too much time. Dr. Chang demanded the board of directors of OBI revoke the issue of technology stocks to avoid hindering the application for an initial public offering. He also declared that his technique would be donated to OBI gratis and revoked the application for a registration of change. Dr. Chang has never acquired the technology stocks.
In other words, the aforementioned technology stocks were only intended and purely private matters between OBI and Dr. Chang. Dr. Chang had never communicated, discussed, or negotiated with Dr. Wong regarding the technology stocks. Dr. Chang had never promised to grant the technology stocks to anyone, either.
II. Regarding the donation of $300,000 to Scripp Laboratories: The former parent company of OBI, Optimer Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: OPTR, hereinafter referred to as Optimer), had planned to collaborate with Scripp Laboratories. The CEO of Opimter, Pedro Lichtinger, was in charge of the negotiation, and both organizations had signed a letter of intent for collaboration. It was a collaboration between the two organizations, irrelevant to the personal relationship and promises between Dr. Chang and Dr. Wong.
Both matters above have been investigated extensively by the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. On 5 May 2015 and 18 November 2015 respectively, both agencies have emailed the results of the investigation to the representing attorney of OBI in the U.S.,  declaring that nothing illegal was found and both cases were closed. On 28 November 2012, OBI has also uploaded the Application for Taipei Exchange Trading of Emerging Stock, which explains the processes from page 7 to page 8.
Dr. Chang wishes to point out the inconceivable fact that the Taiwanese prosecutors have openly violated the secrecy of investigation repeatedly in disclosing the content of the investigation to media, which in turn have been interfering with cases closed in the U.S. and still investigated by the judiciary in Taiwan.  Dr. Chang hopes the judiciary in Taiwan will respect and protect the legal rights and interests of the parties concerned.